Sep 11 2013

 

 

 

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Now you see it and now you don't! Yep, South Korea has 'green-lighted' the world's first disappearing skyscraper. Really one moment it will be totally visible and the next it will appear to be empty sky where it previously stood. Magic now comes to construction! Curb.com reports:

If mankind's race to build tall structures and the endless saga of, say, China's Sky City Tower is getting annoying, fear not: soon mankind will literally be able to make skyscrapers disappear, no muss no fuss. That's right, the world's first disappearing skyscraper has just been approved for construction for the Incheon International Airport area outside Seoul, South Korea. No date is given as the projected completion yet, but according to Architizer, Tower Infinity, designed by GDS Architects, will rise 450 meters (1476.38 feet) in the air and feature "a cutting-edge LED façade system that allows visual information behind the skyscraper to be captured and simultaneously projected from the tower's surface." The building, in turn, will "blend into the background like an enormous, crystalline chameleon."

Tower Infinity, which will be filled not with residences but with "entertainment and leisure purposes," will have the third highest observation deck in the world, and its the exterior can also be used as a giant screen to project photos or movies. Despite its massive, thunderous stature—the architects believe that the primary function of the skyscraper, which they've nicknamed the "Anti-Landmark," is to "celebrate the global community rather than focus on itself." They write: "Instead of symbolizing prominence as another of the world's tallest and best towers, our solution aims to provide the World's first invisible tower, showcasing innovative Korean technology while encouraging a more Global narrative in the process."

Whether Tower Infinity is "a magical piece of technological ingenuity, or a cynical new branch of architectural exhibitionism," as Architizer puts it, one thing's for sure: the $28B "Dream Hub," a minicity of architectural experimentation composed of buildings by Daniel Libekind, Foster + Partners, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, among others, as well as a rather controversial number by MVRDV, probably won't happen in Seoul. So until someone builds more giant handbags, vanishing skyscrapers will have to do. Hey, at least the construction crew can nourish themselves in a Karim Rashid-designed food court.

 

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